News

As 2020 continues to test the world’s patience and resilience, Verdict Medical Devices takes a closer look at what this strange year has meant for the medical AI sector so far.

Verdict Medical; July 8 2020

Elucid Bioimaging Inc. has already gained an FDA clearance and a CE mark for its Vascucap artificial intelligence-based software that analyzes CT angiograms (CTA) to characterize and quantify atherosclerotic plaque to predict a patient’s stroke risk. But recent interim data presented on July 2, 2020, at the Society for Vascular Surgery conference found that the AI algorithm is more effective than standard-of-care diagnostics.

Bio World; July 6, 2020

Boston-based medical technology company Elucid Bio, maker of the Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-cleared and CE-marked vascuCAP software, announced Wednesday, July 1, that its novel artificial intelligence (AI) technology demonstrated a significant improvement in accuracy of stroke prediction as compared to stenosis-based guidelines over a six-year time period.

Neuro News; July 2, 2020

July 1, 2020—Elucid Bio, manufacturer of the vascuCAP software, announced that its artificial intelligence (AI) technology demonstrated a significant improvement in the accuracy of stroke prediction compared with a stenosis-based approach to risk-stratification during a 6-year period in the CRISP Consortium study of carotid risk prediction.

Endovascular Today; July 1, 2020

Elucid Bio, maker of the FDA-cleared and CE-marked vascuCAP® software, announced today that its novel artificial intelligence (AI) technology demonstrated a significant improvement in accuracy of stroke prediction as compared to stenosis-based guidelines over a six-year time period. The interim results of the CRISP trial will be presented on Thursday, July 2, during Scientific Session 9 at the Society for Vascular Surgery conference, SVS Online Summer 2020.

Yahoo Finance; July 1, 2020

Boston, Massachusetts - Feb 17, 2020 - A leading software company called Elucid Bioimaging believes it can. Approximately 1.5 million Americans have a heart attack or stroke each year. They are the two leading causes of death in developed countries around the world, but do we have an opportunity to improve our ability to predict these events? And can we deliver personalized treatment to prevent them?